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Victim Personal Statement

A Victim Personal Statement (VPS) gives a victim an opportunity to describe the effect that the crime has had on them mentally, physically and emotionally.

The information leaflet below explains all elements of a Victim Personal Statement (VPS).  If you wish to make a VPS and haven't yet done so please contact the officer in your case or your Victim and Witness Care Officer.

About this guide

This guide explains the benefits of the Victim Personal Statement (VPS) and the important role it plays in helping victims of crime. It also gives practical details of how to take a VPS. As practitioners, it's important to make sure that all victims are given the chance and choice to make a VPS.

Who is the guide for?

This guide is for anyone who might be involved in the VPS process - including police officers and investigators, as well as staff from the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Witness Care Units and the courts. It particularly focuses on helping police officers to explain to victims why they might want to make a VPS.

What does the guide cover?

The guide begins with a brief outline of the VPS. It explains how vital the police officer's role is in making sure that victims understand the scheme and what its many benefits are.

The guide also has specific sections on:

  • taking a VPS
  • how the VPS works in practice
  • where to find more information.

Why is the guide important?

The VPS allows victims to explain the impact the crime has had on their lives. Research shows that victims who were offered the chance to make a VPS were more likely to be satisfied with their overall experience of the Criminal Justice System. Research also shows that the individual police officer's understanding and explanation of the scheme is crucial to the victim's decision to make a VPS.

This guide gives police officers all the information they need to explain to victims what is involved in making a VPS. This helps victims to make an informed decision about whether to make one.