Search Site

Leave page quickly

Sexting? Think twice

Teenagers are being urged to think twice before 'sexting' and to pause before posting something on social media which could later be a source of regret.

Sexting? Think twice

The latest phase of our #Be Cyber Smart campaign focuses on teenage use of social media and 'sexting' activities - that is sending or sharing explicit or naked pictures of themselves to others.


Check out our video and take a look at the advice and info below.


Teenager? Take a look at this advice about sexting

  • Remember even if you think you are having a private conversation; once you have hit send, where those words or images end up will be out of your hands.
  • Nudes, sexts, fanpics, whatever you call them, sending private pictures of yourself to someone else is never a good idea. Whether it's to your boyfriend or girlfriend or someone you've met online, a quick snap can have long-term consequences.
  • If you have sent pictures and regret it, remember it is never too late to get help -Thinkuknow
  • Children who are 'sexting' may actually be committing criminal offences. If a teenager were to have in their possession an indecent image of another minor (aged under 16), they would technically be in possession of an indecent image of a child, which is an offence under the Protection of Children Act 1978 and the Criminal Justice Act 1988. If someone is prosecuted for these offences, they may be placed on the sex offenders register, potentially for some considerable time.
  • Tell your parent, carer or an adult if someone or something makes you feel uncomfortable or worried, or if you or someone you know is being bullied online.

 

Here are some tips when using social media

  • Pause before you post. What you write could come back to haunt you.
  • How you behave online can affect your future. Think about your job prospects. Do you really want future potential employers to see what you are about to post or send someone?
  • Make sure you check your privacy settings on social media. Do you really want the whole world to see what you are saying or the pictures you are posting?
  • Think about how much information you put online. Could it be used to steal your identity, or are you telling the world information that could be used against you by criminals - have you told potential burglars that your house is empty while you all go on holiday for two weeks, for example.
  • Stay safe by being careful not to give out personal information to people you are chatting with online.
  • Remember that information you find on the internet may not be true, or someone online may be lying about who they are.
  • Meeting someone who you have only been in touch with online can be dangerous. Only do so with your parents' permission and only when they can accompany you.
  • Tell your parent, carer or an adult if someone or something makes you feel uncomfortable or worried, or if you or someone you know is being bullied online.
  • Visit Thinkuknow- CEOP's site with information on internet safety
  • You can call ChildLine on 0800 1111.

 

Information and advice for parent and carers

  • There is a growing trend among children and young people to take indecent photographs of themselves, and sometimes even of friends, to send on to each other or post in public places. This could be on the internet - for example on social media sites - or by sending the photos to each other on their mobile phones.
  • Many young people see it as 'harmless fun' - often thinking it is a good way to show someone they like and trust them. Others may see it as a modern way to push boundaries and experiment with risk taking.
  • Child Exploitation and Online Protection (CEOP) receive daily reports of harassment after private photos have been circulated. This risk comes when children and young people lose control over where the images are circulated.
  • Once an image is on the internet, it can be freely copied by anybody.
  • Children who are 'sexting' may actually be committing criminal offences. If a teenager were to have in their possession an indecent image of another minor (aged under 16), they would technically be in possession of an indecent image of a child, which is an offence under the Protection of Children Act 1978 and the Criminal Justice Act 1988. If someone is prosecuted for these offences, they may be placed on the sex offenders register, potentially for some considerable time.
  • Children and young people may not realise that what they are doing is illegal or that it may be potentially harmful to them in the future.
  • What you can do as parents/carers is educate your children to these dangers. Tell them that this behaviour could come back to haunt them in later life and that once an image is on the internet - you can never get it back.
  • Make sure they stay safe by being careful not to give out personal information to people they are chatting with online.
  • Make sure they check their privacy settings on social media. Ask them; do they really want the whole world to see what they are posting?
  • Educate them around the risks of sharing personal information.
  • Visit Thinkuknow- CEOP's site with information on internet safety.